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New multi-threading technique promises to double processing speeds


UltraMega

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Researchers at the University of California Riverside developed a technique called Simultaneous and Heterogeneous Multithreading (SHMT), which builds on contemporary simultaneous multithreading. Simultaneous multithreading splits a CPU core into numerous threads, but SHMT goes further by incorporating the graphics and AI processors.

 

The key benefit of SHMT is that these components can simultaneously crunch away on entirely different workloads, optimized to each one's strength. The method differs from traditional computing, where the CPU, GPU, and AI accelerator work independently. This separation requires data transfer between the components, which can lead to bottlenecks.

 

Meanwhile, SHMT uses what the researchers call a "smart quality-aware work-stealing (QAWS) scheduler" to manage the heterogeneous workload dynamically between components. This part of the process aims to balance performance and precision by assigning tasks requiring high accuracy to the CPU rather than the more error-prone AI accelerator, among other things. Additionally, the scheduler can seamlessly reassign jobs to the other processors in real time if one component falls behind.

https://www.techspot.com/news/102016-new-multi-threading-technique-promises-double-processing-speeds.html

 

 

Finally we'll be able to run crysis. 

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The description given, makes this sound like a 'no brain-er' technology. 
(One of those 'things' that was both long-wanted and inevitable, but never materialized due to technical limitations and other limiting factors)


(Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong)
One of the major reasons why even today's X86-based Consoles perform 'better for the given HW' is the in-built scheduling/task assignment. -Made 'easy-er' by the fixed configurations of each console's generation.

 

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2 hours ago, LabRat said:

The description given, makes this sound like a 'no brain-er' technology. 
(One of those 'things' that was both long-wanted and inevitable, but never materialized due to technical limitations and other limiting factors)


(Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong)
One of the major reasons why even today's X86-based Consoles perform 'better for the given HW' is the in-built scheduling/task assignment. -Made 'easy-er' by the fixed configurations of each console's generation.

 

I'm not hardware engineer but I think this is somewhat more dynamic that a typical scheduler. 

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SHMT uses what the researchers call a "smart quality-aware work-stealing (QAWS) scheduler" to manage the heterogeneous workload dynamically between components. This part of the process aims to balance performance and precision by assigning tasks requiring high accuracy to the CPU rather than the more error-prone AI accelerator, among other things. Additionally, the scheduler can seamlessly reassign jobs to the other processors in real time if one component falls behind.

 

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48 minutes ago, UltraMega said:

I'm not hardware engineer but I think this is somewhat more dynamic that a typical scheduler. 

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SHMT uses what the researchers call a "smart quality-aware work-stealing (QAWS) scheduler" to manage the heterogeneous workload dynamically between components. This part of the process aims to balance performance and precision by assigning tasks requiring high accuracy to the CPU rather than the more error-prone AI accelerator, among other things. Additionally, the scheduler can seamlessly reassign jobs to the other processors in real time if one component falls behind.

 

That's what I was getting @:
From what I've observed PCs are 'too dynamic' in workloads and hardware configurations to (fully) optimize a scheduler 
(vs. a fixed-function, fixed-hardware Console or Industrial Appliance). As I recall, getting sub-tasks assigned to the correct hardware (at the right moment) is the crux with AAA Games'  performance/optimization.

 

Also IIRC, Msft eventually re-doing the Windows' thread scheduler retroactively uplifted old multi-core CPUs, like AMD FX.

Sounds to me like this could be quite (r)evolutionary, for all applications. Hopefully, technology like this will become standardized or at least normalized
(Rather than kept away from plebian consumers, as is and has been done w/ HBM, PCM, and multi-gig Ethernet)

 

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