Jump to content

Welcome to ExtremeHW

Welcome to ExtremeHW, register to take part in our community, don't worry this is a simple FREE process that requires minimal information for you to signup.

 

Registered users can: 

  • Start new topics and reply to others.
  • Show off your PC using our Rig Creator feature.
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get updates.
  • Get your own profile page to customize.
  • Send personal messages to other members.
  • Take advantage of site exclusive features.
  • Upgrade to Premium to unlock additional sites features.
IGNORED

Asus ROG Swift PG49WCD 49-inch gaming monitor review: The most colorful OLED yet


Barefooter

Recommended Posts

From Tom's Hardware

Full review here Asus ROG Swift PG49WCD 49-inch gaming monitor review: The most colorful OLED yet

 

Quote

Tom's Hardware Verdict

Despite a slower refresh rate than other 21:9 and 32:9 OLEDs, the Asus ROG Swift PG49WCD has everything one could ask for in a gaming and productivity monitor. It delivers a stunning image and replaces two 27-inch 16:9 screens.

Pros

  • Stunning picture with tremendous contrast and vivid color
  • Accurate with no need for calibration
  • Superb HDR quality
  • Smooth gameplay
  • Premium build quality

Cons

  • Only 144 Hz
  • No internal speakers

 

What better way to solve this problem than with an OLED panel? This technology brings back the off-axis quality of CRT and the infinite contrast. Asus’ ROG Swift PG49WCD raises the bar for this genre with all that plus 144 Hz, Adaptive-Sync, HDR, and the widest color gamut I’ve yet measured for any OLED monitor. Let’s take a look.

 

When 49-inch 32:9 monitors first appeared about six years ago, I was not impressed. The earliest examples had low resolution, just 88ppi density, and VA panels, which made the sides of the screen look quite different from the center.

 

Since then, I’ve spent time with some of the best ultrawide gaming monitors with DQHD resolution (5120x1440), but the issue of viewing angles remains. Even with a curve, it’s tough to find the right place to sit so the entire image is uniform in color and brightness.

 

The star of the show here is the PG49WCD’s QD-OLED panel. QD stands for Quantum Dot, which is the same technology used to extend LCD color gamuts. The principle is a film coated with a substance that emits a different color light than what excites it. In LCDs, it’s used between the backlight and the TFT layer. In OLEDs, it goes between the pixel matrix and the front anti-reflection layer. The net effect is a wider color gamut. The PG49WCD has the largest color volume I’ve measured from any OLED panel, monitor, or television at 114.16% coverage of DCI-P3. For perspective, the record among monitors I’ve reviewed is Acer’s X32 with an IPS panel that covers 119%. Yes, the PG49WCD is extremely colorful.

 

Accuracy is also assured, with a factory calibration verified by my tests. No additional adjustments are needed in the PG49WCD’s Racing mode. It’s plenty bright, too. Though it won’t put out the searing peaks of a Mini LED monitor, I found a respectable 453 nits peak for HDR when measuring a 25% window. Asus claims 1,000 nits for a 3% window, which I do not doubt.

 

The PG49WCD is a gaming monitor with a max refresh rate of 144 Hz and Adaptive-Sync. It has been certified by Nvidia and will run FreeSync from 48 to 144 Hz. The response time is a claimed 0.03ms, and that is something I don’t doubt. OLEDs as a category have nearly perfect motion resolution with no need for overdrive. Frame rates have an effect, though, and I have found smoother motion processing in other screens that run over 200fps.

 

As a member of the ROG line, the PG49WCD delivers a full list of premium features. Gaming aids include aiming points, refresh rate counters, timers and a sniper mode. LED lighting comes in the form of a giant ROG logo on the back made from large pixels that display a variety of colors and effects. A KVM switch lets you bind a single mouse and keyboard to multiple source components. DisplayWidget software lets the user control everything from the Windows desktop. There’s also an extensive OSD for changing settings.

 

The PG49WCD takes care of itself with screen protection routines that fight burn-in. In addition, the monitor is built with extensive heat sinks that cool internal components. A graphene film sits behind the OLED layer to dissipate heat from the screen. There is little doubt that the PG49WCD will last for the long haul. And that’s a good thing since it will extract around $1,500 from your wallet.

 

49-inch mega-wides have grown on me as I review more of them. The PG49WCD’s OLED panel makes a positive leap that I find extremely compelling.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a 49" Ultrawide owner, no thank you.

Owned

 Share

CPU: Ryzen 7900x
GPU: Sapphire Pulse RX 7900XTX
PSU: Cooler Master 850w Platinum
CPU COOLER: Cooler Master MasterLiquid PL360 Flux
MOTHERBOARD: Gigabyte B650 Aorus AX
SSD/NVME: Solidigm P41 Plus 2TB Gen4 NVME
RAM: G.Skill Flare X DDR5-6000
CASE: HAF700 Berserker
Full Rig Info

Too much

Owned

 Share

CPU: AMD Opteron 180 @ 3.0GHz
MOTHERBOARD: Asus A8N SLI
RAM: 4x1GB Corsair XMS DDR400 @ 2.5-3-3-6
PSU: eVGA 600BQ
GPU: Sapphire HD5870
SOUNDCARD: Asus Xonar DG
OPTICAL: DVDRW with Lightscribe
SSD/NVME: 64GB HP 2.5" SSD
Full Rig Info

Too much

Owned

 Share

CPU: AMD Athlon 1100MHz
MOTHERBOARD: ECS K7S5A
RAM: 2x256MB Corsair XMS DDR400 @ 133MHz / CAS2
PSU: Antec 350w
GPU: ATI Radeon 9800 PRO
SOUNDCARD: Creative Live! 5.1
OPTICAL: LG 16x DVD-ROM
OPTICAL 2: IOMagic 48x16x48 CDRW
Full Rig Info
Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, Barefooter said:

Just curious... why do you say that?

Well, its kind of interesting and probably long winded, but I'll try to keep it TLDR.

 

I started down the "ultrawide" rabbit hole back in 2007 with PLP Eyefinity with 2x 20" Dells and a 30" Dell monitor.  Absolutely loved that setup for over a decade.  I tragically lost that setup........

 

So, I bought into the marketing hype of modern ultrawide displays, and picked up a 32:9 5120x1440 / 120Hz display.

 

It's not the same, at all.

 

GAMING - Fantastic (when the games work properly at ultrawide, older games have problems)

Daily Use - HORRIBLE.  I'm always using windowed programs anymore, I can't fullscreen videos (due to the wasted space).

For actual daily use / multitasking, I absolutely hate ultrawide now.  I'll take 3 monitor Eyefinity again please.  🤣  Gaming is certainly easier on a single ultrawide monitor.  Absolutely.  Everything else is harder.

Edited by pio
  • Thanks 1
  • Agreed 2

Owned

 Share

CPU: Ryzen 7900x
GPU: Sapphire Pulse RX 7900XTX
PSU: Cooler Master 850w Platinum
CPU COOLER: Cooler Master MasterLiquid PL360 Flux
MOTHERBOARD: Gigabyte B650 Aorus AX
SSD/NVME: Solidigm P41 Plus 2TB Gen4 NVME
RAM: G.Skill Flare X DDR5-6000
CASE: HAF700 Berserker
Full Rig Info

Too much

Owned

 Share

CPU: AMD Opteron 180 @ 3.0GHz
MOTHERBOARD: Asus A8N SLI
RAM: 4x1GB Corsair XMS DDR400 @ 2.5-3-3-6
PSU: eVGA 600BQ
GPU: Sapphire HD5870
SOUNDCARD: Asus Xonar DG
OPTICAL: DVDRW with Lightscribe
SSD/NVME: 64GB HP 2.5" SSD
Full Rig Info

Too much

Owned

 Share

CPU: AMD Athlon 1100MHz
MOTHERBOARD: ECS K7S5A
RAM: 2x256MB Corsair XMS DDR400 @ 133MHz / CAS2
PSU: Antec 350w
GPU: ATI Radeon 9800 PRO
SOUNDCARD: Creative Live! 5.1
OPTICAL: LG 16x DVD-ROM
OPTICAL 2: IOMagic 48x16x48 CDRW
Full Rig Info
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, pio said:

Well, its kind of interesting and probably long winded, but I'll try to keep it TLDR.

 

I started down the "ultrawide" rabbit hole back in 2007 with PLP Eyefinity with 2x 20" Dells and a 30" Dell monitor.  Absolutely loved that setup for over a decade.  I tragically lost that setup........

 

So, I bought into the marketing hype of modern ultrawide displays, and picked up a 32:9 5120x1440 / 120Hz display.

 

It's not the same, at all.

 

GAMING - Fantastic (when the games work properly at ultrawide, older games have problems)

Daily Use - HORRIBLE.  I'm always using windowed programs anymore, I can't fullscreen videos (due to the wasted space).

For actual daily use / multitasking, I absolutely hate ultrawide now.  I'll take 3 monitor Eyefinity again please.  🤣  Gaming is certainly easier on a single ultrawide monitor.  Absolutely.  Everything else is harder.

Ok I can relate to that. It's easy to drag a tab or window to the monitor next to it.  Windowed mode you are always having to resize them.

 

I currently use a 38" 21:9 widescreen with 3840x1600 resolution and have two 27" aux monitors vertically next to it.  I would like to get an OLED for gaming, but just haven't found the perfect size or resolution to replace my current widescreen with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Premium Gold
662 1,269

+1 for anti-ultrawide gang

 

strongly considering grabbing an Asus' PG32UCDM but going to wait to see if anything similar/cheaper comes around (plus it's OOS everywhere for MSRP).

  • Agreed 1

1337.69

Owned

 Share

CPU: Intel i9 10900K @ 51/47 1.26v
MOTHERBOARD: Asus Z590 Maximus XIII Hero
RAM: G.Skill DDR4-4266 CL17 32GB @ 4300 15-16-16-35 2T 1.55v
GPU: Gigabyte Aorus Master RTX 3080 Ti
SSD/NVME: Team Group MP34 4TB NVMe + WD Blue 4TB SATA SSD
CPU COOLER: Arctic Liquid Freezer II 360 + Noctua iPPC 3000
PSU: Super Flower Leadex Titanium 1000W
CASE: Fractal Design Meshify S2
Full Rig Info

420.42

Owned

 Share

CPU: Intel i7 8700K @ 47/43 1.22v
MOTHERBOARD: Asrock Z390 Taichi
RAM: Corsair LPX DDR4-3000 CL16 64GB @ 3200 16-20-20-38 1T 1.35v
SSD/NVME: SN850 1TB + HP EX950 2TB + SX8200 2TB NVMe
HDD: 4x Seagate Exos X16 14TB
OPERATING SYSTEM: Windows Server 2022 Datacenter
OTHER: LSI Logic 9207-8i
NETWORK: Intel X540 10 GbE
Full Rig Info

$600

Owned

 Share

CPU: Ryzen 7 5825U
MOTHERBOARD: SFX14-42G-R607
RAM: 16GB LPDDR4-4266
SSD/NVME: SK Hynix P31 Gold 2TB M.2 NVME
SSD/NVME 2: Samsung PM991a 512GB M.2 NVME
GPU: NVIDIA RTX 3050 Ti 4GB 35W @ 55W
OPERATING SYSTEM: Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2021
OPERATING SYSTEM 2: Debian 12.5 KDE
Full Rig Info
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, The Pook said:

+1 for anti-ultrawide gang

 

strongly considering grabbing an Asus' PG32UCDM but going to wait to see if anything similar/cheaper comes around (plus it's OOS everywhere for MSRP).

The 48" C1 is going to go to the living room and I think a 42" C4 is in my future.

 

I've always hated ultrawides and don't think that will change anytime soon.

Edited by Sir Beregond

Showcase

 Share

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 5900X
GPU: Nvidia RTX 3080 Ti Founders Edition
RAM: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32GB DDR4-3600 (@ 3733 14-8-14-14-21-35 1T GDM)
MOTHERBOARD: ASUS Crosshair VIII Dark Hero
SSD/NVME: x2 Samsung 970 Evo Plus 2TB
SSD/NVME 2: Crucial MX500 1TB
PSU: Corsair RM1000x
MONITOR: LG 48" C1 OLED
Full Rig Info

Owned

 Share

CPU: Intel Core i7-4790K, Core i9-10900K, Core i3-13100, Core i9-13900KS
GPU: various
RAM: Corsair 32GB DDR3-2400 | Oloy Blade 16GB DDR4-3600 | Crucial 16GB DDR5-5600
MOTHERBOARD: ASUS Z97 Deluxe | EVGA Z490 Dark | EVGA Z790 Dark Kingpin
SSD/NVME: Samsung 870 Evo 1TB | Inland 1TB Gen 4
PSU: BeQuiet Straight Power 12 1500W
CASE: Cooler Master MasterFrame 700 - bench mode
OPERATING SYSTEM: Windows 10 LTSC
Full Rig Info

Owned

 Share

CPU: M1 Pro
RAM: 32GB
SSD/NVME: 1TB
OPERATING SYSTEM: MacOS Sonoma
CASE: Space Grey
Full Rig Info
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me, resolution, especially vertical resolution reigns supreme over everything else. I like my 38" 21:9 ultrawide but that's mostly because the screen resolution works out well to match 4K's 3840 width and has a respectable height of 1600. My previous 3440x1440 ultrawide was annoying in that regard, and 1440p ultrawides are a dealbreaker for me now. I hate all these ultrawides coming out now that are still 1440p despite being 39", 45", 49", and beyond. Meanwhile, 1080p ultrawides are so useless in my book that they may as well not exist.

 

My monitor isn't without its flaws though. Ultrawide LCD monitors have unacceptably awful QC compared to any LCD TVs. I played panel lottery to settle on my current one, which was the third unit I had shipped out to me.

 

As far as daily usability goes, I have no issues with 3840x1600 ultrawide at all. A properly configured Windows PowerToys FancyZones makes multitasking and window management almost as easy as discrete monitors, and then I use Sizer to force application windows to specific dimensions and XY coordinates if needed.

 

Would I be better served with a 40" 4K on my desk, if such a thing existed? Maybe. I hadn't thought of that before because I don't want too much extra physical height for nearfield viewing outside of games. The 38" ultrawide works because I still have two zones configured on it with lots of extra height over 1080p. The reason the height of my 55" 4K TV isn't an issue is because I have it divided into 2x2 1080p zones to make it tolerable for nearfield viewing.

 

The main problem with my workspace is that this 38" ultrawide at 34.6" cabinet width is about as wide as I can realistically go on my desk, so even a hypothetical 40" 4K's physical dimensions would make the monitor/TV wider than the available space. The closest fit is a 42" LG OLED, but the cabinet is just a bit too wide at 36.4". The next smaller, common 4K screen size is a paltry 32" with a too small cabinet width of about 27-28".

 

As for the PG49WCD in the review, the built-in KVM is convenient. That's about all that I like about it. Otherwise, I'd find that 1800R curve obnoxious if you're trying to work while simulating two 2560x1440 screens that would typically be flat. I've yet to read any reviews that mention how Samsung has addressed the awful burn-in issues of first-gen QD-OLED technology beyond any vague burn-in prevention techniques that clearly didn't work well enough for first-gen QD-OLED displays. Above all, I hate the vertical resolution.

 

I'll also say that "No internal speakers" as a con is the most utterly laughable con I've seen for a high-priced monitor. Imagine spending $1500 on a monitor for an immersive OLED gaming experience and then deciding that you're going to cheap out on proper speakers. 🙄 FOH. I can't tell you what either my monitor or my TV sound like, but I guarantee they're both crap.

Edited by Snakecharmed

Owned

 Share

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 7900X
MOTHERBOARD: Asus ROG Strix B650E-F Gaming WiFi
RAM: 64 GB (2x32 GB) G.Skill Trident Z5 Neo RGB DDR5-6000 CL30
GPU: EVGA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti FTW3 Ultra Gaming
SSD/NVME: 1 TB WD_BLACK SN850X PCIe 4.0 NVMe
SSD/NVME 2: 2 TB WD_BLACK SN770 PCIe 4.0 NVMe
MONITOR: 38" LG UltraGear 38GN950-B 3840x1600 144 Hz
MONITOR 2: 55" Samsung Neo QLED QN85A 4K 120 Hz 4:4:4
Full Rig Info

Owned

 Share

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 5600G
MOTHERBOARD: ASRock X300M-STM
RAM: 16 GB (2x8 GB) ADATA DDR4-3200 CL22
SSD/NVME: 500 GB Gigabyte Gen3 2500E PCIe 3.0 NVMe
SSD/NVME 2: 3.84 TB Samsung PM863a Enterprise SATA 6 Gbps
CASE: ASRock DeskMini X300W
CPU COOLER: Thermalright AXP90-X36
CPU COOLER 2: [Fan] Noctua NF-A9x14 92mm PWM 2.52 W
Full Rig Info
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Sir Beregond said:

The 48" C1 is going to go to the living room and I think a 42" C4 is in my future.

 

I've always hated ultrawides and don't think that will change anytime soon.

 

One of the things that's stopped my from buying a 42" is what to do with my 48" CX that I'm using now. I already have a 75" in the living room and a 49" in the bedroom. I don't really want strangers from marketplace coming to the house and no longer have a vehicle it will fit in to meet elsewhere lol. 

 

I also hate 32:9 ultrawides for everything other than the racing sim.

  • Agreed 1

Owned

 Share

CPU: 5900X + Optimus block
MOTHERBOARD: MSI X570 Ace
GPU: EVGA RTX 3090 FTW3 Ultra + Optimus block
RAM: 32GB Oloy Blade 3600CL14
SSD/NVME: 1TB SN750 Black
SSD/NVME 2: 1TB SN750 Black
SSD/NVME 3: 2TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus
CASE: LD PC-V7
Full Rig Info

Owned

 Share

CPU: 7800X3D
MOTHERBOARD: B650E-I Strix
RAM: G.Skill Flare X5
GPU: Reference 6950 XT
CASE: InWin D-Frame Mini
WC RADIATOR: MO-RA3 with 4x180mm Silverstone fans
FAN CONTROLLER: Aquaero
Full Rig Info

Owned

 Share

CPU: 12600KF
MOTHERBOARD: Z790I Strix
RAM: G.Skill Trident Z5 Neo
GPU: RTX 2080
CASE: Sliger SM580
WC RESEVOIR: Phanteks R160C
WC RADIATOR: XSPC TX240 Ultrathin
FANS: Phanteks T30
Full Rig Info
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

This Website may place and access certain Cookies on your computer. ExtremeHW uses Cookies to improve your experience of using the Website and to improve our range of products and services. ExtremeHW has carefully chosen these Cookies and has taken steps to ensure that your privacy is protected and respected at all times. All Cookies used by this Website are used in accordance with current UK and EU Cookie Law. For more information please see our Privacy Policy